Monday, November 24, 2014

"Fun? Well Rather" The Diary of Virginia Clay McClure - part of the Sesquicentennial Stories Series






November 24, 1910



*Picture of Sweetland’s 1910 Machine

 It’s clean athletics our team stands for, and we’re proud of them though Central beat us 12 to 6; if they had played clean ball we’d have won.  Webb’s heart was broken and he left the field crying.  Webb and Shanklin and Gaiser and Threlkeld were hurt.  Oh, how it hurts to have Central beat us.  Never mind, there’ll be another year.

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

"Fun? Well Rather" The Diary of Virginia Clay McClure - part of the Sesquicentennial Stories Series





 November 1910



“Go on and say it; it’s good for your teeth.”

“It would be as hard to spell your way through France as to eat your way through a 10,000# cheese.”

“Zemmie.”



*Program insert.  “ENTRANCE TO THE ‘HOME OF THE BLUE AND WHITE’. [Official S.U. Yell]”

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

"Fun? Well Rather" The Diary of Virginia Clay McClure - part of the Sesquicentennial Stories Series



November 12, 1910



St. Louis beat us 9 to 0, but we’re proud of our team.  They called the team “Little Kentucky Colonels” and complimented them highly.  



Fun? Well, rather. I had John’s suit and it fit fine.  Lydia got me a hat.  “Peck” said I looked like “Puf”! Well, that’s alright.  I never had such a good time in my life.  Addie was an awfully good-looking boy.  Marion Johnson looked like Newt Duff.  Cornelia server was a grand looking fellow.  Everybody had a splendiferous time.  And O! You fixtures in the back yard Sunday morning! Did Mrs. Wallis get angry?  Did the Kappa Sig. boys peek out the windows?  Did we take some cute pictures? Well, rather!


 “We’ve all got it in us!”


*Inserted is a small booklet with a pencil attached.  The front has an illustration of three black cats and three Jack o’ Lanterns and reads, “Co-Ed Nov. 12, ‘10”.  The inside of the booklet has the handwritten names of 22 girls.
 

Monday, November 10, 2014

"Fun? Well Rather" The Diary of Virginia Clay McClure - part of the Sesquicentennial Stories Series



November 10, 1910


Girls got to go to the Southern depot to see the team off for St. Louis.  Sophomores took the team and the Sophomore girls to the depot in an auto-wagon, and the girl came back in it.  Came through Main St. singing and yelling.  Had an awful good time.  

Southern Railroad Depot in 1939. http://exploreuk.uky.edu/catalog/xt702v2c8t1s_1039_1

Sunday, November 2, 2014

"Fun? Well Rather" The Diary of Virginia Clay McClure - part of the Sesquicentennial Stories Series



November 2, 1910



About two dozen girl went to see Ethel Barrymore.  “Babe” chaperoned one crowd, and “Shiny” one.  In our crowd were Jessie Milton, Irene, Ruth, Edna, Marry Pollet, “Shiny” and I.  She is almost the best actress I’ve seen, but I didn’t like the play.  It was a tragedy – her acting in the third act was grand.  I’ve now seen Maude Adams, Mrs. Leslie Carter, Lillian Russel, Henry James, and Ethel Barrymore.  “Peter,” says I, “Lie still; don’t wiggle.”

From the Henrietta Alice Metcalf Performing Arts Photographic Collection, 1880-1955

http://exploreuk.uky.edu/catalog/xt7gxd0qsz74_15_1


Friday, October 31, 2014

"Fun? Well Rather" The Diary of Virginia Clay McClure - part of the Sesquicentennial Stories Series



October 31, 1910



Faculty dance and reception – lost my souvenir, which was a programme of the exercises in honor of Prof. White.  [Illegible name] Cafers and Dr. Reynolds both made addresses, and G. Stole presided and made remarks.  Glee club gave some selections and a soloist from Sayre sang several songs.  About a thousand people there, and we had an awful time trying to serve them in the gym.  After the program, bub finally got through.  There was an awful crowd dancing in the Armory.  We stayed awhile and looked on, and then came home.  “Shiney” came in and spent the night with me and we talked until about two o’clock.  Nearly everybody had a good time.  The gym and Armory were beautifully decorated with leaves, ferns, Hallowe’en lanterns, pumpkins, etc.

*Inserted is a small clipping from a newspaper or magazine.  It reads, “If a pig were caught in a fence and it squealed and you pulled it out, merely because it bothered you, would you be committing an immoral act? Ask Poet Schultz?” 
 


Virginia's friend, "Shiney" Katharine Margaret Schoene class of 1910